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eeePC 900 sound

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Hello (again). After a long period, I though about trying AROS again. This time with a small "netbook" of the yesteryears, an Asus eee PC 900 (the original, with 16Gb SSD that came with Xandros linux distro).

Installation and everything else went relatively well (although it would help tremendously if there was an installation image available that could be written to a USB disk, without the need for the DVD at all).


Anyways, from what I can see, everything else seems to work reasonably well (I haven't tried network yet, so that might raise up to be a nuisance still :D ), but I can't get any sound out of the device.

I checked the HCL and it lists the eee PC as working with sound, but tested with AspireOS distro.

So, my question is: What's there in AsipreOS (related to eee PC) that enables the sound and can I get it from the AspireOS DVD and into the Icaros installation on my eeePC?

According to PCI Tool, the sound is:
Multimedia Audio
Intel Corporation
02801FB/FBM/FR/FW/FRW (ICH6 Family) High Definition Audio Controller
Vendor 0x8086 Product 0x2668

There's a "hdaudio: HiFi 16 bit stereo++" entry in the AHI prefs, but even with practically "trying everything" with that, there's no sound.


EDIT:

nvm.

found the page where it is suggested to add QUERY to top of ENVARC:hdaudio.config. Actually was there, but commented out. Just removed the ; in front of it and now sound works.

Now for the network... :P

Posted on: 2017/11/23 22:48

Edited by AnttiV on 2017/11/23 23:23:03
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Re: 'ello

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Quote:

DizzyOfCRN wrote:

Well, I salvaged from my workplace a few old 133MHz or so 386 based touchscreen automation control panels. Chief said that normally we don't give them but just keep your mouth shut and take them away as "boxes".

I thought to someday install Aros on it. Already reverse engineered the serial port protocol for the panel... :) They have a solid die cast aluminium cases and a lcd/tft panel with touchscreen on them and also over a "button" overlay.


That's a nice sounding project. I'd love to see that some day, for sure.

Just goes to prove that even trash can be used for something. ;)


ps. 133Mhz 80386? Holy Balls Batman that's a fast one. I had a 33MHz back in the day and I though they only went up to 40MHz...

Posted on: 2015/8/15 0:57
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Re: 'ello

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Quote:

Mangonuts wrote:
It's funny you mentioned the PowerMac. I just found a G4 Quicksilver on the street a few days ago. Unfortunately it doesn't power on but if I fix it up I'll be installing MorphOS to check it out.


I'll wish you luck with the G4. Actually I originally went with MorphOS (3.9), but just afterwards found out the hilariously overpriced (and restrictive!) licenses and the dev/publisher not even responding to emails and went nope.png and moved on to *nix :)

Quote:

Actually two of my three monitors came from the street too, as did my AROS and Haiku boxes. That's where I do most of my shopping :). It's a shame I can't send you a monitor as I see plenty of good ones that get thrown out.


Oooh, that's a shame. I really hate it when people throw away perfectly working stuff (unless it's *real* old, like throwing working 386/486 boxes away in 2015 :P). I always try to either recycle or give it a way to somewhere it goes into use.

I get most of my stuff from my friend who brings them from his workplace where they've been "thrown out" (meaning "here, do something with this or we'll throw it away.")

Quote:

The multi-OS box isn't running anything terribly esoteric at the moment. Just some flavours of Linux, and PC-BSD. I tried to install OpenIndiana and DrangonFly on it recently but both failed for various reasons. Next up may be Minix 3 :)


Oh, I've thought about installing OpenIndiana also, but never really got to it. I hadn't even heard of DragonFly before.. but then again, I've never been really familiar with BSD at all (more of a Mac/Linux guy).

Not to be nasty to anyone, but I'm not really surprised you had trouble installing OpenIndiana :) As it's based on Solaris that was .. eh, infamously .. hard to install on x86/desktop systems. I remember having a shouting contest ("install you d*ckhead!") with Solaris 8/9(?) a few times in the past. I think I've actually got it to install *once* on x86 hardware.

What I *really* like to get to work, is eComStation. I loved OS/2 Warp back in the day, and would like to try what it's like in the current iteration. But eComStation is commercial software with a steep price tag and in beta to top it off. I don't understand asking a price from beta software, but eh, it seems to be the current "trend" among publishers. (I'm looking at ya, game publishers!)

Posted on: 2015/8/12 22:33
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Re: 'ello

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That's a very good solution and one I really contemplated going with, but unfortunately my selection of monitors didn't include ones with that many inputs. Most of my hardware is old/ancient/dinosaurian, and at least second- if not third- or fifth- hand :)

So I could only locate a few VGA-only monitors, one VGA+DVI combo and then my "main" screens with DVI+HDMI, HDMI+DP and HDMI. And with most of them, the changing between inputs is a pain in the royal bleep.

I'm currently using the VGA+DVI one with my "testing" systems, since it has a nice standard 1280x1024 native resolution that is available with almost any VESA driver out there. (The "better" ones are 1920x1080 which none of the VESA drivers support, unfortunately)

And yeah, that "time problem" seems to be a constant thorn on our sides... Technically there's 24 hours in one day, but I'll be damned if I can use 4 of them in any given day :D

Mind if I ask you, what are you currently storing in that "multi-boot monster" of yours? :)

My current "project" is (or was, it's pretty much stable at the moment) to get an old PowerMac G4 (Dual-1Ghz, "Quicksilver 2002") to a working state with anything more current than the 10.x/9.1 that was installed on it. (For those who care: I went with Lubuntu 14.04.2 LTS, and while it is working now, it wasn't a walk in the park to get it to install... ) But it's nice to see that even a ~13 year old machine can still be useful and run a somewhat-current OS and applications that support current standards.

Posted on: 2015/8/11 10:32
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Re: Hi, I'm Wolfy

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'ello fellow emulator enthusiast =)

did you ever do MacOS emulation? If you did, do you remember when the "MacOS emulator community" was in... well, too much excitement over the fact that somebody announced a PPC emulator? And then the following Big Disappointment when they never delivered.

Or when that one emulator was finally able to boot and run MacOS 8.1 (instead of just System 7.5.5)? That was fun and exciting.

Or when Frodo64 (it was called something like that) was "announced" and finally able to boot and play commercial games.


Posted on: 2015/8/4 1:38
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Re: 'ello

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Quote:

ncafferkey wrote:

But then again, maybe you shouldn't have got rid of those PS/2 mice either
I use a cheap PS/2 to USB adapter to plug one computer that doesn't have PS/2 into the KVM.


Unfortunately I didn't have any optical PS/2 mice anymore, and I will not suffer the non-optical mice ever again :D There's been TOO many times cleaning the mouse balls :P

Quote:

I suppose they're more expensive to make now with the requirement to switch digital video and USB. I got my 4-port VGA+PS/2 one for 17 GBP ten years ago.


At least with HDMI/DVI that seems to be the case. The VGA+USB ones werent that much. I ordered a 4-port VGA+USB one from eBay last night for 9.00€ Not bad if you ask me.

But then again, I'll bet some good money that those who designed the cheaper (and almost all, to be fair) models have NEVER, EVER had to plug them in. I mean the design of these things are so so stupid my old broken left-foot boot would design it better. There's no way in a million years to place those in any way so that the cables would be neatly organized and not in the way AND you'd have access to the button that changes between computers. Why, of WHY put the VGA (for the monitor) on the same side as the peripherals? Or why put the computer connections on EVERY side?

It would be SO simple to just put the console peripherals (1-3 USB connectors) and the selector (knob, buttons(s), whatever) beside the ports and have the console monitor and all computer connectors on the back. Then you could have in on the table and neatly just connect your input perhipherals to the box and have the selector there and at the same time you could organize the monitor/computer cables behind/under the desk to be out of the way.

Sorry for the rant, but I spent an hour looking through eBay to find a single nicely designed KVM, but nope, there aren't any, unless you go to the 16+ port professional route. Or 2 port HDMI, but in both cases the price is upwards from 80€, at least.

Posted on: 2015/8/4 1:29
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Re: 'ello

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Quote:

ncafferkey wrote:
Welcome AnttiV. Just something I'm curious about: why don't you use a KVM switch if you're short of space? I have five computers connected to one monitor through a combination of an analogue VGA switch and the monitor's multiple inputs.


That's a very good question, and one that unfortunately does not have a good answer. The long and short of it is: they cost a ton and I'm a dumbass :P

I used to run two computers via a (Belkin?) KVM switch a couple of years ago. But this spring when I did cleaning I thought I'd get rid of the old thing since I've not used it for years. Then I threw it away (or more precisely, gave it away to a second hand thingy). Then just a bit afterwards I started again to assemble more systems and install more OSes and went... I'm an idiot.

Then again, it was a VGA+PS/2 KVM, and I'm not sure if most systems support PS/2 hardware anymore. I sure as heck don't own any PS/2 mice anymore. So maybe I wasn't a complete arse when I got rid of it.

Second point: they do cost a TON around here. (a simple two-machine VGA + USB one is $100+ in most stores.)

I thought of ordering one from eBay just the other day, but I haven't yet. I think I'll search today a bit more. I'd *like* to find a 3+ computer one (that would do VGA/DVI + USB) and would be "manual" (like a knob or something, the "press numlock + number things *never* work reliably). I'd like to get a HDMI one but BOY where they NOT cheap, even from ebay.

Posted on: 2015/8/3 12:22
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'ello

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Hi. I thought I'd make a proper introduction post also, although this and that came out already in that other thread...

Anyways, first off: I never owned an Amiga (what? Blasphemy!), sadly. Most of my friends did, however, so I do have *some* experience on that.

I've always owned systems tad on the eccentric side.. I had a CP/M machine in the 80s. My first computer was a "Basic 2000" (basically a ZX81 clone). When my friends started to have C64s, I had a Sega SC3000 (yes, the computer, not a console). I eventually did get a C64 and straight after the CP/M machine.

I've always been a "casual" gamer, meaning I do game, but don't take it so... seriously. I gamed a lot on the C64, i game a lot on my current Windows-PC. But my "passion" on computers has always been the system and technical side of things.

I got my "real" PC (a 80386SX) and went on upgrading that piece by piece for some time. As far as systems went, it was fairly standard DOS -> DOS+Win3.11 because really nothing else was available here before the internet came along.

When Win95 came out and all my friends went there, I dualbooted to OS/2 Warp. After that I usually had two or more computers, one running windows for gaming, one with some form of Linux to actually do stuff (I love programming, but I'm not that good at it...)

Later (at the turn of the millennium, I think) I got a Mac and have been a sort-of mac user since then, at least on and off. I still believe that any professional work should be done on a non-Windows machine if you're serious :)

Then by some chance I bumped into BeOS and was instantly in love, I think BeOS was one of my all-time favorite OSes. I was really disappointed when Be Inc folded and BeOS was cancelled. But later I was really excited to find out about Zeta/OpenBeOS/Haiku.

I'm married, for 15 years this fall (holy crap), and I have three (four in a few weeks) kids. Each one of the kids has their own computers and have had since they've been able to do something other than to drool on it :D

I'm a Tech Support by profession (although currently unemployed) and I don't think I've ever in my life bought a fully ready system for myself or anyone that I know :P I've built them myself from the get-go.

I currently own a whole bunch of computers (in addition to my wife's and children's ones), but not all of them are complete at the moment (I'm short of monitors and actually physical space to put them on).

But I currently do have four machines in "complete running state":

* Windows 7, i7-4790k / 16Gb / GTX680 gaming rig
* Mac OS X 10.1, Q9650 / 8Gb / GTX285 "hackintosh" Mac (for anything serious)
* Xubuntu 15, i5-2500 / 8Gb /GT640 linux machine for other serious things and debugging. This machine also has a Haiku Nightly installation.
* Icaros 2.0.3, E6600 / 4Gb / 8400GS "Amiga" for testing and "playing around"

There's fifth one in the works for Haiku, but I don't really have space for the AROS one either (it's just standing on a random table at the moment, taking up precious space), so I don't think that'll materialize anytime soon.

My "other" interest is mobile devices, I do own a bunch of them also tablets and phones alike. At the moment I can't seriously decide which one I like more, iOS or Android. (I do have more Android devices and have used them way longer, but the new iPhone 6+ is actually a good device.)

Besides technical things, I like reading (fantasy/scifi), languages (well really part of the reading and/or computers also, but eh), drawing and cooking. I'd *like* to think I'm at least adequate in everything but drawing is easily my weakest hobby, mostly because I don't really have time for that and what that would take is practice, practice, practice...

With five (soon six) people living here, I *DO* get a healthy amount of practice in cooking though :P (And I think I might practice the eating part a little too much occasionally :D )


Well, that was a tad longer and more info-filled than I originally though, but here you go. Initially when I find something new and excellent, I tend to get excited and be there a lot (too much? :D ), but then after awhile sometimes I retreat away and quiet down a bit (or a lot). But I DO follow up on PMs/posts even years afterwards, even if I seem to have been non-active for awhile. (Just answered a 2-year old xda-forum thread because someone replied to me :)

So, take what you want from it and don't be afraid to ask. I *will* follow up to any questions, if I get notifications. :)

And I'll be happy to discuss any of my interests (in length, you've been warned) :)


Posted on: 2015/8/1 4:52
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Re: OK, I give up. Need help. (first time trying to install Icaros)

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Quote:

DizzyOfCRN wrote:
I would advice to stay away from any VIA based chip sets.


This might be the single most helpful advice in the history of personal computers :D No personal offense to any VIA employees, but holy crapamundo, did they ever come up with the worst products ever. I remember having to "do battle" with VIA chipsets a LOT back in the Win9x/earlyXP days in my tech support career. Rather not experience that again. (Bonus fact: combine a VIA-chipset based motherboard, an AMD-K6 -core CPU, a S3 video card and Windows ME. Things that weren't supported in that combo vastly outnumbered the things that actually were :P )

I think we need a 'If $viadetected then display "middlefinger.png"' in most software... :D

Quote:

I might not have totally removed the hack code from the USB-stack which tried to support it by allowing driver to write past it's buffers.

I had a really hard time figuring out why PCDuino (A babbling Allwinner processor card) crashed my Aros setup. I had no VIA chipset and never will, but the code allowed for ANY chipset to write past it's buffers. (Not EHCI)

It all dependent on the phase of the moon and what not as the buffers for Poseidon USB-stack are in stack. A copy back buffer might have also sufficed but that would mean the data buffers should have been copied. I removed the "please overwrite the stack" option.


That sounds.. not optimal, like they say :P I'm not a hardware developer, except in the strictest sense (I do own a couple Arduinos and do some simple stuff with them), but I do know writing past buffers isn't exactly the recommeded way to do stuff :D

Quote:

Linux people also have hard time trying to support VIA USB chips. If I recall correctly they have a watchdog timer that keeps an eye on the the driver.

Everytime a babbling USB device is inserted on VIA based USB driver then the chip set gets reseted. I am assuming that the VIA chipset then gives a last dying interrupt and one would need to browse the frame buffer list and recover from the error. Linux does not do that as far as I know. I tried to find a VIA based USB card but I did not find one cheaply enough.


That actually sounds hilarious in all its terribleness. Sounds like the VIA developers just added a " || die "good luck." " to an end of a random line :P

Quote:

As Poseidon's buffers are in stack then the crash might manifest itself in ANY unusual and unrelated place. What seems the reason for the crash might not actually be the reason. It was REALLY difficult to examine. Aros has no or very little memory protection so the integrity of the stack is foremost and then a good set of memory allocation routines provided by the OS.


... that sounds like you're not running out of things to do in the near future :D

sort-of-update on the Aros machine case:

I *think* I can get the "VIA-box" running adequately with Win7 and give that computer to my youngest daughter. Then I just need to repurpose her current one to another task and then I can get this already-tested-and-working intel-based machine as my AROS box.

E6600, 4Gb of DDR2, GeForce 8400GS, Realtek network and integrated intel HDAudio doesn't sound too bad for a "testing environment" ;)

And then perhaps as an icing on the cake get my Amiga Forever license from *somewhere*, upgrade it to the latest and integrate it with AROS...

EDIT: oops

Posted on: 2015/8/1 0:46
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Re: OK, I give up. Need help. (first time trying to install Icaros)

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Quote:

ncafferkey wrote:
Maybe I should look for one of those ASRock motherboards: it sounds like I'd have lots of debugging fun with it


You can have this one :D I'll bet you'd have your work cut out for you for the next few years.. :P

Seriously though, I'll get rid of this motherboard if I just can get another S775 to replace it. At this point I'm willing to believe that the problems are caused by it. It might not be, but eh, another motherboard can't be worse... ;)

ps. Serious note: If I *do* get another one, you really are welcome to this one, if you seriously want to debug things with it. If it'll help AROS developmet, I'm all for it.

EDIT:

Well I'll be damned. Sometimes I really hate it when I'm right - at least when it originally was a joke.

The problem with the GeForces actually *IS* the thrice-damned ASRock motherboard... I took another machine (that I can't keep in AROS use), a Lenovo desktop tower workstation, with is based on an Intel Chipset (Q965), and while the display adapter nor network worked for AROS, the sound did right out of the box.

I then installed the already-tried-and-failed GeForce 8400GS (because the design of the Lenovo is so utterly stupid it is not possible to fit the other cards to test) and while JUST after click the native mode -grub menu, I'm still greeted with "out of range".. a few seconds later AROS boots happily to the desktop in 1280x1024@60Hz mode using the Nouveau driver.

So it works, and it works FAST. I'm furiously thinking how can I get that computer to AROS use and ditch that ASRock in some hole between two rocks..

But yeah, just to let you know, there's probably no problem with any of those cards at all, it's just the ASRock/VIA motherboard that f*cks up everything ^_^

TL;DR: Damn it all, VIA, Get your act together.

Posted on: 2015/7/30 9:30

Edited by AnttiV on 2015/7/30 15:03:27
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