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Re: So... what are we?

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2007/3/13 15:52
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OlafS3 wrote:
I am the one saying that

all amiganoid systems are mainly retro, some are more modern, some less

Aros offers (as mentioned) some modern features but still lacks lots of, expecially on software level

it mainly attracts people who were former amigans or current users. I do not understand why people have problem to accept that something is retro or would you describe it as modern and up-to-date? The same is true for AmigaOS and MorphOS. At least Aros has a real opportunity to attract new users and developers now who become interested in Aros 68k on new 68k hardware and might interested to use it on different hardware too. But that is mainly true for existing community, outside people have lots of choices, why use Aros missing components and software?


I guess my issue with 'retro' is that using that description may give someone stumbling in here not because they have any particular links to the Amiga (i.e. anyone under 25 or so...) but becuase they are interested in alternative OSs (and yes, we do get them occasionally). Seeing 'retro' they may think that, due to lacking a supply of 3.5" floppy disks and not wishing to connect that old dial-up moden their Dad had in the loft, this system is not for them.

In terms of choices, well, consider my analogy of the car and bike again (and yes, in this analogy the bike is AROS). If anyone could choose to use their car, why the heck would they use the bike? The car has so much more - seats, roof and doors, an engine... And yet people do choose the alternative despite its shorcomings, maybe because they just enjoy the experience of riding the bike, maybe because of its simplicity, something they can easily understand the workings of, or maybe because for that quick pop down the road to the shops it's simply quicker and easier to jump on the bike than in the car. It's all about choices and what works for the individual in a specific situation.

Maybe I should just borrow a term from another interest of mine, Steampunk. We often describe Steampunk to the many bemused onlookers as a punknik is in progress as 'retro futurism' so maybe that's AROS, looking to the past to develop an alternative future. There's also a link in the DIY nature of Steampunk. AROS, the Steampunk OS... maybe not, but it does suggest an interesting desktop theme...

Cheers,
Nigel.


Posted on: 6/27 10:15
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Re: So... what are we?

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2007/3/13 15:52
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Mangonuts wrote:
AROS fills a niche of sorts in that it is the only open-source Amiga OS replacement and also the only one that runs natively on x86, as well as m68k.

As for its practical use, sure the *nixes will do most things better for the same low price, but for my money they aren't half as fun.


+1! Not to mention is always seems you need a degree in computer science to do even the simplest things.

Cheers,
Nigel.

Posted on: 6/27 10:17
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Re: So... what are we?

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cybergorf wrote:
In the last decade, or even the last two decades there was not much movement in Operating-System-Land.
Unix-likes (Linux and macOS/iOS) are dominating mobile and server market.
MS Windows is king of the desktop.

Everybody thought an OS needs to have at least memory protection and multi-user support.

But in the last couple of years there occurred an interesting change:
Uni-kernels are growing fast!
Famous members are OSV (osv.io open source sponsored by huawei) and NetBSDs Rumpkernel (rumpkernel.org)

They provide so called library-operating-systems, where applications live in a single address space with a (minimal) kernel and are single user.

Why? because it is faster.
Security is added via virtualization. So if you want to run a database-server, you start a new instance of your minimal-os under e.g. the xen-hypervisor. This OS runs only network and database - but very fast in a single address space.

Since AROS is pretty small and lightweight it would make a good candidate for this approach.
Instead of making it heavier and add more features like memory protection and multi-user, it could make more sense, to add a framework, were we can easily start an application in a new instance of AROS, share networking and filesystems, and provide some means of message-passing.

more uni-kernel projects:
http://unikernel.org


Interesting points. Presumably only one instance would run Wanderer, this displaying the outputs of the single applications running on each of the other instances. I guess you could have a config file which would tell whatever mechanism launched the new instance what resources other then the kernel would be needed (libraries etc.) The downside would be of course the use of memory, but in a 64bit system that would be pretty immaterial.

Cheers,
Nigel.

Posted on: 6/27 10:24
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Re: So... what are we?

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2007/8/21 11:21
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ntromans wrote:

Interesting points. Presumably only one instance would run Wanderer, this displaying the outputs of the single applications running on each of the other instances. I guess you could have a config file which would tell whatever mechanism launched the new instance what resources other then the kernel would be needed (libraries etc.) The downside would be of course the use of memory, but in a 64bit system that would be pretty immaterial.
Cheers,
Nigel.


Exactly, that would be one possible use case.
https://www.qubes-os.org e.g. does it that way for desktop applications, but is running a full blown OS each time :-/

There is "Nitpicker" a GUI that can take different linux frame buffer and displays them in windows, including resizing etc (https://www.inf.tu-dresden.de/index.php?node_id=1426&ln=de)
(I wanted to try this out a couple of years ago with AROS, but the frame buffer output for AROS hosted was removed back than ... don't know if it came back?)

And there is of course Xpra (https://www.xpra.org)...

Now combine this with a new Ryzen with 16 threads - each running a different AROS-Task

Posted on: 6/27 10:44
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Re: So... what are we?

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2004/3/29 9:54
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An operating system...

Please don't try to box AROS into a cubby hole that suits your description, it is not that (though it may fulfil that role for you).

Posted on: 6/28 18:46
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